Isle of Cultural Appropriation: Wes Anderson’s ornate ISLE OF DOGS reduces Japan to aesthetic value

Dogs are often said to be man’s best friend, and Wes Anderson’s singular style has the knacks to prove it: in Isle of Dogs he carves a world brimming with offbeat characters and his recognisable palette. The film dips its toes into stop-motion animation, and it envisions a dystopic future where a tyrannical mayor has banished its canine population to a separate island. But Anderson’s … Continue reading Isle of Cultural Appropriation: Wes Anderson’s ornate ISLE OF DOGS reduces Japan to aesthetic value

FILM FIGHT CLUB EPISODE 34: CALL ME BY YOUR NAME, DOWNSIZING & DARKEST HOUR

Originally posted on FalkenScreen:
? ? Where we fight about a film everyone should see, a tiny Matt Damon, what Gary Oldman has to do to win an Oscar, Tangerine Director Sean Baker’s latest, the bear from Peru & the year that was, with special guest from The Social Film Network Debbie Zhou – tune in Wednesdays 7:30PM on 2SER 107.3  Continue reading FILM FIGHT CLUB EPISODE 34: CALL ME BY YOUR NAME, DOWNSIZING & DARKEST HOUR

Hayes Theatre Co’s ASSASSINS is a whirlwind of fairground nostalgia

Stephen Sondheim’s Assassins stirred up controversy at the time of its inception in 1991. With a book by John Weidman, it centres around the assassins who killed presidents of the United States – no doubt a contentious subject. But through a chorus of voices, it marks a questioning of the disillusionment associated with patriotic idealism; the flaws in a system that elevates individual rights. So … Continue reading Hayes Theatre Co’s ASSASSINS is a whirlwind of fairground nostalgia

NT Live: Angels in America Part 1 & 2 – A transforming display of wit and humanity

Tony Kushner’s Angels in America has been renowned in the contemporary theatre canon for its boldness, fantastical premise and social relevance. The UK National Theatre’s most recent production, directed by Marianne Elliott (War Horse, Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time) marked my first exposure to this magnificent scale of a play – and I was utterly gobsmacked by its concoction of realism with fantasy … Continue reading NT Live: Angels in America Part 1 & 2 – A transforming display of wit and humanity

Sydney Theatre Company’s rollicking CLOUD NINE subverts stereotypes

With fast-biting dialogue and quasi-slapstick humour, Sydney Theatre Company’s revival of Caryl Churchill’s Cloud Nine is full of kinetic energy, 38 years after its premiere. A satirical portrait of colonial Africa that shows how Western values stifle authentic expression, director Kip Williams invigorates his production’s contrasting two-act movement with radical, vibrant humour that presents a sharp challenge to heteronormative ideas of femininity. Cloud Nine opens … Continue reading Sydney Theatre Company’s rollicking CLOUD NINE subverts stereotypes

Film Review: First Girl I Loved

This review was originally published at ImpulseGamer.com.au With some relationships, admiration begins from afar. Expectations of love and ideas of sexuality are turned upside down for Anne (Dylan Gelula) as she photographs fellow teenager Sasha (Brianna Hildebrand) at a high school softball game, leaving her instantly beguiled. But love isn’t all easy in the Sundance indie film First Girl I Loved, where the placement of … Continue reading Film Review: First Girl I Loved

Theatre Review: Big Fish (Hayes Theatre Co)

Musicals that pull on your heart-strings are not an easy find, but the Hayes production of Big Fish – a modified 12-chair version of the 2013 Broadway musical – proves that imaginative but humble stagings can ignite the magic of storytelling equally, if not better than the often rife efforts of a full-blown spectacle. Based on 1988 novel by Daniel Wallace (also adapted on screen … Continue reading Theatre Review: Big Fish (Hayes Theatre Co)

Theatre Review: The Taming of the Shrew (Montague Basement)

Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew is easily subject to criticism about its misogyny and therefore its relevance in contemporary society. Montague Basement’s production, however, is a fresh interpretation that revitalises its outdated predecessor, forefronting victims of domestic violence and transporting Shakespeare’s comedic play to a dramatic platform. Staged initially on a blank stage with black curtains draped on the wings, director Caitlin West has … Continue reading Theatre Review: The Taming of the Shrew (Montague Basement)