THEATRE REVIEW: The Taming of the Shrew (Montague Basement, 2016)

Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew is easily subject to criticism about its misogyny and therefore its relevance in contemporary society. Montague Basement’s production, however, is a fresh interpretation that revitalises its outdated predecessor, forefronting victims of domestic violence and transporting Shakespeare’s comedic play to a dramatic platform. Staged initially on a blank stage with black curtains draped on the wings, director Caitlin West has … Continue reading THEATRE REVIEW: The Taming of the Shrew (Montague Basement, 2016)

THEATRE REVIEW: Heathers the Musical (Sydney Opera House, 2016)

Heathers: The Musical features a great score and talented cast but the flashy direction falters, making it too often vapid. “Freak, slut, loser, short bus,” sing the majority of teens in the opening number of Heathers: The Musical, a sharp dark comedy about the effects of teen bullying, suicide, and violence — set to a rock-pop score. Based on Michael Lehmann’s 1988 film, Heathers: The … Continue reading THEATRE REVIEW: Heathers the Musical (Sydney Opera House, 2016)

FILM REVIEW: Captain Fantastic (2016)

This review was originally posted on ImpulseGamer.com Honesty is a rare feat in cinema, but Matt Ross finds it in Captain Fantastic, reflecting the progressiveness of its male protagonist – Ben, played by Viggo Mortensen, who has raised his children away from the civilisation of the city and within the primal, survivalist forest. It is the news of the death of their mother, which brings … Continue reading FILM REVIEW: Captain Fantastic (2016)

Talking about Slow Cinema: TURIN HORSE (Tarr, 2012)

Disclaimer: This is a continuation of a collection of my thoughts for a personal film portfolio; ideas deriving from Ira Jaffe’s Slow Movies (2014): ‘Introduction’ and Ch. 7 ‘Rebellion’s Limits’. In a symposium in 2007 devoted to Béla Tarr’s cinema, David Bordwell stated that “we want a cinema that puts the brakes on, slows things down. What we have to start doing if we want … Continue reading Talking about Slow Cinema: TURIN HORSE (Tarr, 2012)

A REFLECTION: Dead Ringers (Cronenberg, 1989)

Davis’ The Desiring Image interweaves an argument which seeks to broaden the category of queer cinema beyond classifiable gay cinema, and dislodge automatic relations within sex, gender and desire through cinematic form and structure. Notably describing the ‘first generation’ of New Queer Cinema, this view unfolds itself towards the view that desire should be an examination outside the norms of heteronormative cinema. David Cronenberg’s Dead … Continue reading A REFLECTION: Dead Ringers (Cronenberg, 1989)

A REFLECTION: Palindromes (2004, Solondz)

Disclaimer: This is a continuation of a collection of my thoughts for a personal film portfolio; ideas deriving from Gerald Sim, The Subject of Film and Race (2014): Introduction ‘What Is Critical Race Film Studies?’ and Chapter 3 ‘Post-Structuralism and the Neo-Marxian Subject’. In Gerald Sim’s book, he begins his introduction with a primal question that is asked of cinema: “is it racist?”. It is … Continue reading A REFLECTION: Palindromes (2004, Solondz)

Resource and Environmental Degradation: LESSONS OF DARKNESS (Herzog, 1992)

Disclaimer: This is a continuation of a collection of my thoughts for a personal film portfolio; ideas deriving from Nadia Bozac’s, The Cinematic Footprint (2012): ‘Introduction’ and Ch. 2 ‘Resource’. In Lessons of Darkness, Herzog’s genre-bending strategies and unconventional approach to cinema separates his documentary from the conventional; merging – as Bozac writes – nonfiction and fiction, the real world with the imaginary, to capture … Continue reading Resource and Environmental Degradation: LESSONS OF DARKNESS (Herzog, 1992)

The Avant-Garde Documentary: LEVIATHAN (Castaing-Taylor & Paravel, 2012)

Disclaimer: This is a continuation of a collection of my thoughts for a personal film portfolio; ideas deriving from Scott McDonald, Avant-Doc (2015): ‘Introduction’ and section on ‘Sensory Ethnography’. Castaing-Taylor & Paravel’s Leviathan offers an affectual and physical experience through documentary style, but diverts from the conventional documentary through its experimental camera work and desire to depict raw reality. The Sensory Ethnography Lab formed by … Continue reading The Avant-Garde Documentary: LEVIATHAN (Castaing-Taylor & Paravel, 2012)

Disgust and Mise-en-Scène: THE COOK, THE THIEF, HIS WIFE AND HER LOVER (1989, Greenaway)

Disclaimer: This is a continuation of a collection of my thoughts for a personal film portfolio; ideas deriving from Eugenie Brinkema, The Forms of the Affects (2014): ‘Preface: Ten Points to Begin’, Ch. 2 ‘Film Theory’s Absent Centre’, Ch. 6 ‘Disgust and the Cinema of Haut Goût’ and UNSW lecture conducted by Julian Murphet (8 April 2016). A traditional definition on affect derives from its resistance … Continue reading Disgust and Mise-en-Scène: THE COOK, THE THIEF, HIS WIFE AND HER LOVER (1989, Greenaway)

A REFLECTION: Boarding Gate (2007, Assayas)

Disclaimer: This is a continuation of a collection of my thoughts for a personal film portfolio; ideas deriving from Steven Shaviro’s Post-Cinematic Affect (2010): ‘Introduction’ and ‘Boarding Gate’. On the surface, Oliver Assayas’ Boarding Gate (2007) is not remarkable – it is riddled with  a thin plot and vague characters – two elements that can make the dismissal of the B-grade thriller easy. But looking … Continue reading A REFLECTION: Boarding Gate (2007, Assayas)